1975 Beauty Ad, Head & Shoulders Shampoo, New Mild Fragrance, Pretty Redhead Girl Wearing Denim Jean

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1975 Beauty Ad, Head & Shoulders Shampoo, New Mild Fragrance, Pretty Redhead Girl Wearing Denim Jeans Jacket with Appliqués

Tagline:
"Strong & Gentle and now... (Sniff) Mmmm. A new mild fragrance!"

Published in Co-Ed magazine, January 1975, Vol. 20, No. 5.

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1971 Fragrance Ad, Cachet Perfume, New from Prince Matchabelli, Three Young Women

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1971 Fragrance Ad, Cachet Perfume, New from Prince Matchabelli, Three Young Women

Tagline:
"Introducing Cachet. A fragrance as individual as you are."

Opening advert text:
"We know you don't want to look like the next girl. Maybe you don't want your fragrance to be like the next girl's either. Well now, it needn't be. Because now, we've created a new kind of fragrance called Cachet."

Published in Cosmopolitan, May 1971, Vol. 170, No. 5

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1971 Auto Accessories Ad, Lee Air Filters, with Fashionable, Pretty Brunette Girl in Harbor

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1971 Auto Accessories Ad, Lee Air Filters, with Fashionable, Pretty Brunette Girl in Harbor

Back when saving two dollars was a kinda-big deal... and women were surprised to learn that, OH MY, they could indeed do minor car maintenance themselves.

Tagline:
"Should a pretty girl change her own? Go ahead."

Opening advert text:
"Change the air filter. Save two bucks. You'll laugh when you see how easy it is. Go to a discount store. Pick up a Lee Filter. The best. Open your hood. Find the old filter, right on top. Turn one little wing nut. Change filter. Tighten wing nut. Two minutes, job's done. All this time you'd been htinking you'd look silly sticking your head under the hood. Silly girl. Look at all the beautiful money you could have been saving."

Published in Cosmopolitan, May 1971, Vol. 170, No. 5

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1973 Beauty Ad, Clairol Condition Hair Treatment, with Legendary Celebrity Hair Stylist Julius Carus

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1973 Beauty Ad, Clairol Condition Hair Treatment, with Legendary Celebrity Hair Stylist Julius Caruso

Vintage 1970s magazine advertisement, endorsement of world-renowned celebrity hair stylist Julius Caruso (1928 - 2005) for Clairol Condition Hair Treatment, 1973.

Tagline:
"You can't tackle damaged hair with something made for tangles."

From Caruso's 2005 obituary in New York Times:
Julius Caruso, one of the earliest of Manhattan's celebrity hairstylists, who appeared as a consultant at beauty pageants and in television commercials, died on Tuesday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He was 77.

The cause was complications of diabetes, his family said.

Mr. Caruso and his brother, Enrico, who also operated a famous salon and who died in 2004, were trained as stylists by their father, Michael Caruso, an Italian immigrant who came to New York as a stowaway and found a job sweeping a barbershop floor in exchange for a place to sleep. He eventually opened a salon in the Tudor City complex, where his sons began working as teenagers.

For more than 30 years, Julius Caruso owned a salon at 72 East 55th Street, across Park Avenue from Enrico Caruso's shop at 110 East 55th Street, and the brothers had rosters of famous clients, including Ann Sheridan, Marilyn Monroe, Joan Rivers, Hugh Downs and members of the Ford, Rockefeller and Vanderbilt families, said Julius's wife, Aurora.

"Marilyn Monroe used to come into the beauty salon," Mr. Caruso's daughter, Aurora Galanti recalled. "My father would spend hours putting her hair in rollers and fixing her hair, and then she would put her hands in her hair and just mess it up as much as she could. My father would say, 'I just spent two hours trying to get her to look like a lady.' "

Julius Caruso also worked for Michael of the Waldorf in the Waldorf-Astoria before opening his business in 1952 in a town house on East 55th Street. He remained there until 1986, then moved to the Carlton House at 22 East 62nd Street. The salon will continue to operate there.

Mr. Caruso also had a salon for 25 years in Southampton, N.Y., where he met many of his celebrity clients. He was hired as a consultant for Procter & Gamble and Bristol Meyers, promoting their products in advertisements, and for many years was the spokesman for Lilt, a home permanent.


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Published in Ladies Home Journal, April 1973, Vol 90 No. 4

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1971 Ad, Barbra Streisand's Newest Album, "Stoney End"

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1971 Ad, Barbra Streisand's Newest Album, "Stoney End"

Caption:
"A new album by a young singer."

Opening advert text:
"It's easy to forget how young Barbra Streisand is. After all, most people in their 20's haven't made 2 plays, 4 TV specials, 4 movies and 16 albums. Now on her new album, 'Stoney End,' Barbra sings the songs of today's best young composers, like Joni Mitchell's 'I Don't Know Where I Stand,' Gordon Lightfoot's 'If You Could Read My Mind,' Harry Nilsson's 'Maybe' and the title song by Laura Nyro."

Published in Cosmopolitan, May 1971, Vol. 170, No. 5

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